On Single Moms Who Play it Safe in the Age of Economic Inequality–and Stay Unmarried

This great article by historian Stephanie Coontz explores the relationship between progress in gender equality and the rapidly growing economic inequality plaguing the U.S. Of particular interest is her take on the well-known gap in marriage rates between lower- and higher-income mothers:

Low-income women consistently tell researchers that the main reason they hesitate to marry — even if they are in love, even if they have moved in with a man to share expenses, and even if they have a child — is that they see a bad marriage or divorce as a greater threat to their well-being than being single.

Their fears are justified. Chronic economic stress is associated with an increased incidence of depression, domestic violence, alcohol or drug abuse and infidelity, all of which raise the risk of divorce. If a woman’s marriage breaks up or her husband squanders their resources, she may end up worse off than if she had remained single and focused on improving her own earning power.

She concludes,

Turning back the inequality revolution may be difficult. But that would certainly help more families — at almost all income levels — than turning back the gender revolution.

Amen and thank you. It’s great to see someone talking sense about the actual risks and benefits of marriage, but the piece also offers excellent data on wages, marriage rates for various classes, and so forth. Read it here.

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One thought on “On Single Moms Who Play it Safe in the Age of Economic Inequality–and Stay Unmarried

  1. Svarar på mitt eget inlägg igen. För nu ser jag att Häcken var snabbare än ÅFF och har gjort klart med el Kabir.Hur som helst, nu har jag prenesterat ett namn för att Nicket ska fatta vilken nivå jag snackar om. Och som ÅFF borde snacka om också som ersättare till Mange. Men det gäller att vara på tårna, annars finns inga såna lirare kvar när slantarna vänts för många gånger!

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